10/27/08

I feel so powerless.

When I got home from work today, my house was dark. As was every other house on the street. I called National Grid and reported it, and they now say it'll be back on around midnight.

I've got the generator running, and a few minutes ago I decided I'd get on NG's website to see how many people in my area are down. Turns out the magic number is 7. While I was there, I looked around and saw this:



Thank you, National Grid. That's some good, solid advice you're tossing my way. Maybe it's just me, but I try to avoid just about all potentially deadly things, regardless of whether or not I'm advised to do so. Wolf packs, the Ebola virus, Canadian health care, you name it and I'm actively avoiding it.

For the nature freaks among you, here's a picture I took of the place I hiked to a couple of Sundays ago. It's a composite of 6 pictures, so it's a little wide to post in blogger, hence the link. Enjoy!

Or not. Just do what feels right to you.

19 comments:

  1. Yeah, I'm all for avoiding potentially deadly things too. Good call, Faceless Power Company!

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  2. It's so nice to know the people that are taking your money are looking out for you, sort of.

    Beautiful pic. We are going camping this weekend, nd I only hope it looks as fall-ish.

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  3. They advise their customers to avoid deadly carbon monoxide? Really. I would NEVER have known to avoid deadly CO. Who knew?

    Wonderful photo, what a beautiful spot. Thanks!

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  4. I wonder if any customers would notice if the National Grid warned them about the dangers of "dihydrogen monoxide".

    Every year, it kills tens of thousands. So be alert!

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  5. OK, but what about non-deadly carbon monoxide? Is that cool?

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  6. To be honest, it depends who it is. If Clooney decided carbon monoxide was a Good Thing, I can't be blamed for what I do, OK?

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  7. I honestly think that the only reason they want you to stay away from that gas is because they don't potentially want to lose a paying customer!

    Oh, and just how exactly are you supposed to be able to check any kind of update online while the power is out? Do they really expect EVERYONE to have some generator out back for just these types of emergencies?

    If so, then maybe they also should warn of the potential complication of housefires from a generator being placed too close to the residence!

    Great pic, BTW! I need to get some rest and relaxation in here in the very near future...

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  8. p jane9:41 AM

    So jealous you could get online running off generator ;) By the time we lose power, our DSL provider has loooong been down. The only thing more frustrating than being without power and listening to hubby curse his way through firing up the generator? Waiting on hold with the Power Provider for an estimated restoration time only to be told due to overwhelming call volume, callers are directed to go online for detailed outage information--*click*.
    Jormengrund, you beat me to it, but exactly!

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  9. kristina11:43 AM

    And just what is "potentially deadly" about the Canadian health care system? "Sicko" was not about Canada...

    Very nice composite pic!

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  10. Anonymous12:37 PM

    Christina , I worry . watch the news our excellent hc system just systematically endangered the lives of thousands of people by re-using hypo dermic needles formerly plunged into the failing veins of poor unfortunate souls infected with HIV , hep C and other life threatening blood and fluid born diseases, wtf

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  11. Anonymous1:10 PM

    Johnny,
    Sounds like stupid advice, but every year some numbskull runs a generator in his basement, or burns a kero-heater with a shiitey wick; and drifts off on a happy long-sleep as a result.
    Mike
    Upstate

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  12. kristina3:10 PM

    anonymous, you are just scare-mongering. The needles in question were never "plunged into the failing veins of poor unfortunate souls infected with HIV , hep C and other life threatening blood and fluid born diseases", they were used to insert medication into intravenous lines.

    Now I'm not saying it is not dangerous nor cause for great concern or there shouldn't be a serious investigation and measures put into place for it to never happen again, but it was only at one small complex in northern Alberta, so you shouldn't be painting the whole nation-wide system with the same brush.

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  13. I love vistas where you can see the curvature of the earth. Great pic!

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  14. Composite of 6 pics? How did you stitch them together? I use the software that came with my Pentax camera, but I always end up with some blurry distortion at the seams... You picture looks pretty seamless to me.

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  15. codemonkey, check out this free program. It's awesome:

    http://hugin.sourceforge.net/

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  16. Your blog rocks. You really need to check this out: http://poppalina.typepad.com:80/my_weblog/2006/09/armed_robbery_f.html

    Reminds me of your JC Penney catalog thread. My kid should be happy I don't know how to knit.

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  17. The photograph is beautiful. Where was it taken?

    (My word verification is "Tutork" which I shall define as "a person who coaches hula hoopers.")

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  18. Mamie, It's near a place called Platte Clove, NY.

    Also, a Tutork is clearly some sort of Vulcan stringed instrument.

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  19. Anonymous1:18 PM

    At least the Canadian HC doesn't leave people out to die in the cold, or bankrupt them because they don't have health insurance.

    Disclaimer: I am Canadian

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